Posted 6 hours ago

zeramato:

Students who still have a lot ahead of them. Students like me, who still have dreams, goals, and students who still aim for achievements. But because of this tragedy, it all faded away. 

I bow and salute to the brave students who saved the lives of others and sacrificed themselves. They are heroes. They are people who deserves a lot better than awards. They deserve to be in Heaven, a place full of happiness and there will be no more sufferings. I also pray for the lives of the family and the people involved in this accident and specially the souls of these heroes.

I hope that the students who were saved by these mighty students will live their lives to the fullest, achieve their dreams and goals and love their family more. I also wish that they will live being inspired by the heroes who saved their lives. Please do so.

And for the captain, my middle finger salutes you. Live well. In guilt. Thank you.

#PrayForSouthKorea

Posted 20 hours ago

I am writing an essay on the Cuban Missile Crisis for My Latin American Cultures Class. Then i’ll need to finish my essay on political comparisons of Pearl Harbor vs. 9/11….

When did I try to convince myself I was over reading about spies? Alex your supposed to be studying Human Rights not reliving your 16 year old fantasies…..

Posted 1 day ago

antichrist-misha:

SO HAS EVERYONE SEEN THE MARVEL ONE-SHOT AGENT CARTER, BECAUSE IF YOU HAVEN’T, I STRONGLY SUGGEST YOU DO SO

THIS WAS THE GREATEST THING EVER. I STRIVE TO BE THIS WOMAN. 

Posted 1 day ago

bethrevis:

you could kill a man in any of these dresses, and pretty sure no jury would convict you. those are killing-men dresses, that’s what i’m saying

(Source: thedaymarecollection)

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago

p0kemina:

houseoftombombadil:

pinkthatfuckingpink:

notanadult:

utterlyfubar:

rcmclachlan:

doodlyood:

spinachandrice:

theonewholovesbooks:

thatfilthyanimal:

fawnthefeminist:

Young women are having difficulty accessing tubal ligation, despite it being a relatively safe (death rate is 1-2 per 100,000) and elective surgery.

There is a waiting period of 30 days for women seeking tubal ligation, yet no waiting period for men seeking vasectomies. 

(Source)

Young women are often discriminated against when seeking sterilization. Many doctors ask offensive questions (“What if you met a billionaire who wanted to have kids with you?”), state categorically that their patients are too young to consider the surgery, and generally act as though, as one woman who tried unsuccessfully to be sterilized at the age of 21 in the U.K. put it, ”just because I was a woman, I’d reach a point where an urge to breed would overcome all rational thought.” (Perhaps unsurprisingly, that woman’s 25-year-old husband faced no such presumptions when he asked his doctor for a vasectomy. The procedure was quickly approved.)

(Source)

Say that at 18 I slap down enough money so I could have my whole body covered head-to-toe in tattoos, piercings all over myself, a mountain of cigarettes, plastic surgery, and plan to have like 20 babies… but if I try at all to safely make it impossible for me to breed for the sake of my health suddenly its like WOAH THERE SLOW DOWN MISSY YOU’RE NOT READY FOR THIS KIND OF COMMITMENT YET

I have stage III Endometriosis, which means I have to get my uterus removed because I literally have terrible cramps ALL THE TIME and not just when I’m on my period. Now, I’ve always said I don’t want any children for personal reasons and I don’t need my uterus, really. I am not worried about that surgery and I don’t feel any kind of nostalgia over an organ I won’t ever use. 

The thing is, my doctor is a ‘man’. This ‘man’ told me I had to get pregnant right now before it’s too late. I told him I didn’t want to get pregnant and explained the multiple reasons but what, do you ask, did my doctor have to say about this? 'Well, better have a kid now because just imagine how depressing it must be being a thirty-something woman without children and a husband?'

I was diagnosed a year ago. I should have gone through surgery six months ago and I still can’t find a doctor that will perform the surgery without trying to force me to have children first. Basically, if you’re a woman you don’t have a say in what can and cannot be done to your body without a shitload of people getting in the way AND I’M FUCKING SICK OF IT.

Women are getting non-consensually sterilized in prison but no doctors in my area while tie my tubes at 24 because I might regret it? Fuck you, doctors. I have more purpose in life than dropping babies. Some of those women in prison are probably great moms and I have no interest in parenting. Let us have a say!

A dear friend of mine wanted to have her tubes tied.  She was about to give birth to twins and the doctors wouldn’t consent because she wasn’t 21 yet.  She had already had children and they still refused to let her have the procedure.

My friend got a vasectomy a week after asking his doctor for one, no problem. He was 25.

Me? I’ve asked 4 different doctors for some kind of permanent sterilisation—tubal ligation or Essure or whatever—and I get a pat on the head and a “You’d regret it if you did.”

Oh, DIDN’T REALIZE YOU HAD A DIRECT LINE TO MY BRAIN.

On the flip side, as a vagina-having person who had her tubes tied at the age of 26 (after having 4 children, however):

MY HUSBAND HAD TO SIGN A CONSENT FORM IN ORDER FOR ME TO HAVE THE PROCEDURE DONE.

How many times have we heard stories about husbands having vasectomies behind their wives backs and never telling them, letting those wives wallow in guilt and misery, thinking it’s their fault that they can’t get pregnant?

And yet I had had to get my husband’s permission to have my tubes tied.

(Obviously this was a decision we’d talked about extensively beforehand, so it’s not like he was about to say no, but we both couldn’t believe the fucking audacity of the hospital, asking HIS permission for ME to do something with MY body.  In fact, he said as much to the nurse that brought in the forms.)

I am 36. I’m single, I don’t have kids and I don’t want kids.

I also had horrendous, frequent periods. When I went to the gynaecologist, she recommended that we try a Mirena. I let her know that I’d had menorrhagia on a previous form of low-dose, oestrogen-only birth control (implanon), and that I was apprehensive that it wouldn’t work.

She said “Well, after that you’re out of options.”

I was incredibly upset. I was willing to try, but what if it didn’t work? Was I literally condemned to a life where I’m bleeding and in pain more often than not and I just have to put up with it?

I rang my parents. My Mum listened to me and said “That doesn’t sound right” and put my Dad (who’s a doctor, and a qualified obstetrician/gynaecologist) on the phone.

Apparently I was not out of options and she shouldn’t have said I was. The next option is a surgical D & C to see if that fixed it, and if that didn’t work, an ablation, which would have left me permanently infertile. If that didn’t work, a hysterectomy (although Dad warned me that I should do what I could to avoid the hysterectomy, it comes with a horde of other side effects.)

I don’t know whether it was fear, I don’t know whether it’s because I was a public patient. I don’t know what it was. But the gynae was so scared of female infertility that she wouldn’t even give me information about treatment options. I had to ask my father.

(FYI, the Mirena worked and I had a shouting row with the gynaecologist where I accused her of having her objectivity and medical judgement biased by the religion of her employers.)

I’m so lucky that my doctor is almost “pushing” sterilization on me. He’s super supportive and knows that I’m done having kids, but still don’t have anything permanent planned. 

When I approached my specialist about permanent forms of birth control, the first thing she said to me was that I was too young (I was 22).  I kept telling her that it was a decision I had made nearly a decade ago because of having Ehlers Danlos Syndrome and now POTS and scoliosis, but she kept trying to convince me that I wasn’t old enough to make that decision.  My decision has been formed because of my poor health and high complications with pregnancy that could be deadly.  My mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother all had complications with birth and miscarriages from EDS, and it’s a miracle that my mother even lived through her miscarriage.  After explaining this, my rheumatologist and EDS specialist finally said that they could get me in contact with an  high-risk OBGYN to see if there are other options for me for having children.  

BUT I DON’T WANT CHILDREN.  I don’t want to pass along these disorders.  I don’t want to be on five months of bed rest.  I don’t want to risk miscarriage after miscarriage or dying during giving birth.  I don’t want to dislocate my hips whilst giving birth.  I don’t want my organs to tear and never heal properly because of EDS.  I don’t want to have to care for another being while I can’t even take care of myself because of the fatigue and pain.  I don’t want to subject a child to have to take care of me as I become more disabled.  I ALREADY HAVE A CAT.  I CANNOT TAKE ON ANOTHER DEPENDENT.

It just infuriates me that between the health risks, family history, and my own decision about my life and body, I am still not taken seriously.  This shouldn’t be a problem!

All of these stories are literally infuriate me.

(Source: redundant-lioness)

Posted 1 day ago

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

Posted 1 day ago

mymodernmet:

24-year-old photographer Asher Svidensky recently traveled to west Mongolia with the intention of documenting the lives of traditional Kazakh eagle hunters, people who tame eagles for the purpose of hunting smaller animals.

With the traditions typically laying in the hands of the boys and the men, the biggest surprise throughout the journey was Svidensky’s discovery of a young eagle huntress, 13-year-old Ashol Pan, the daughter of an experienced eagle hunter. These stunning photographs symbolize the potential future of the eagle hunting tradition as it expands beyond a male-only practice.

Posted 1 day ago

saatchiart:

Each week, we showcase an emerging artist from around the world who is already garnering attention for their work. Taking inspiration from the Saatchi Gallery’s 25-year history of discovering new talent, One-to-Watch presents some of the most exciting artists on Saatchi Art helping collectors to identify strong emerging talent. Click here to see our exclusive look at artist Kelly Puissegur.

Posted 2 days ago

suitupweird:

Inspiration | Outfits | Wear It Weird

Posted 3 days ago

Robin Hood

Here is my first shot a new style of poetry. A bit more narrative. 

 

You keep finding the scraps of the person you once were.

Angry. Bitter. Lonesome. Reliant.

You needed a Robin Hood in a forest that has no ends.

And so you waited.

And waited.

And waited some more.

To pass the time, you began to write notes to yourself.

“On self-rambling..” “Oh such self thoughts.”

I am here and thus I shall stand.

But the longer you stay somewhere, the smaller the trees become.

The paths trace again and you long for a new route.

You are impatient and learn, painfully albeit, that you need to become the hero.

The Robin Hood. The Joan. The Wendy. The Peter. The David Bowie riding out in style. So you stand up and brush your knees.

If you squint hard enough, you can locate Polaris pretty decent.

That’s a good start.

And so you begin to journey thinking you already knew everything because why travel when you can wait.

Along the way, you meet visitors and they teach you.

And you begin to listen…

I was intelligent?

What fools we let ourselves become.

Who ever had me to believe that I had all the answers?

Please Friar, teach me more.

For I am simply a child, with a heart of gold (that probably needs a good shine).

And so you learn. Be wise. Be foolish. Be bold. Be kind.

And so you try. Not all of them work. Sometimes you are the bad guy, but we can’t always be Cinderella in a world of Auroras. Oh well.

The darkness. The loneliness. The bitterness you had once, when waiting, for anything, a meager signal. They all start to change.

It’s like training for the boxing ring.

Day one is rather hard. Bruises in glorious places. Everything aches for days.

Because you know there is so much to be done.

But the years pass. And its no longer, can you modify this for me, I need help.

It’s: give me something harder because I’m better than that.

My fury is more controlled and better than it ever was.

And you do things you couldn’t imagine before.

Because you are training. You are learning. And for gods sake, please remember. 

Always be patient, but never wait for anyone ever again.

Because you are your own Robin Hood.

You think the weak wait forever? The broken and the bruised, let themselves be pushed around till they are nothing.

That’s for losers. You are far too radiant for that.

The forest looks like it might be getting thinner.

Is that light I see?

What was all that anger before?

You are no longer a child. Grow up.

And so you do.

And yet, here you stand. Arms stronger. Mind bolder. And thoughts more attuned to the visitors you have met along your journey.

You are not done yet. Training only really just begun.

But look at those old scrapes.

Meager. Minuscule.

They are feeble to the tapestries’ you are creating now.