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rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context

that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

(Source: bigfatphallusy, via mariaacristinaax3)

kyuubijrr:

pitchblackglow:

foxgrl:

gokusgirl:

funkycops:

imperfectwriting:

I went to the mall, and a little girl called me a terrorist. 

My name is Ela.  I am seventeen years old.  I am not Muslim, but my friend told me about her friend being discriminated against for wearing a hijab.  So I decided to see the discrimination firsthand to get a better understanding of what Muslim women go through. 

My friend and I pinned scarves around our heads, and then we went to the mall.  Normally, vendors try to get us to buy things and ask us to sample a snack.  Clerks usually ask us if we need help, tell us about sales, and smile at us.  Not today.  People, including vendors, clerks, and other shoppers, wouldn’t look at us.  They didn’t talk to us.  They acted like we didn’t exist.  They didn’t want to be caught staring at us, so they didn’t look at all. 

And then, in one store, a girl (who looked about four years old) asked her mom if my friend and I were terrorists.  She wasn’t trying to be mean or anything.  I don’t even think she could have grasped the idea of prejudice.  However, her mother’s response is one I can never forgive or forget.  The mother hushed her child, glared at me, and then took her daughter by the hand and led her out of the store. 

All that because I put a scarf on my head.  Just like that, a mother taught her little girl that being Muslim was evil.  It didn’t matter that I was a nice person.  All that mattered was that I looked different.  That little girl may grow up and teach her children the same thing. 

This experiment gave me a huge wakeup call.  It lasted for only a few hours, so I can’t even begin to imagine how much prejudice Muslim girls go through every day.  It reminded me of something that many people know but rarely remember: the women in hijabs are people, just like all those women out there who aren’t Muslim. 

People of Tumblr, please help me spread this message.  Treat Muslims, Jews, Christians, Buddhists, Hindus, Pagans, Taoists, etc., exactly the way you want to be treated, regardless of what they’re wearing or not wearing, no exceptions.  Reblog this.  Tell your friends.  I don’t know that the world will ever totally wipe out prejudice, but we can try, one blog at a time.  

coming up next on white people solve racism

muslim women dont need your white saviour attitude, you might now finally realise what it’s like to be excluded from society because of a piece of garment but you’re never going to experience it in the way we do.

she literally worded this so well and so honestly and tried so hard not to be rude, she just tried to understand what you go through. she’s not trying to be a saviour, she’s trying to raise awareness. she never said she’d solve anything or experience it like you do. stop doing exactly what other people do to you and shut down someones ideas just because of their color or religion or anything. this is a valid and completely pure hearted thing. 

^

It’s funny how people act like white people are the biggest douchebags, and then act like total asshats themselves, huh?

She did this to get a GLIMPSE into the shit Muslim women are put through. She never claimed total understanding; in fact she said that she “can’t even begin to imagine how much prejudice Muslim girls go through every day.” She ADMITTED that she doesn’t know everything these women go through, and yet she’s STILL attacked? I cannot fathom why it’s deemed “okay” to be prejudiced against white people, even when we try to understand what it is people of other ethnicities/skin tones/nationalities/religions/etc go through. If you want, we can stop trying to understand and let everyone wallow in their self-pity.

(Source: olentaalla, via mariaacristinaax3)

gailsimone:

berenzero:

And people wonder why I love Wonder Woman so much.

Bingo.

(Source: fanbingblink, via fsparverius)

kbthinks:

Fuck Yeah Women of Color

Damn

(Source: oberynthemartell, via vhsangel)

Did anyone notice…

jdisapunk:

thesuperjew:

Obama mentions his wife in his victory speech: “…The woman who agreed to marry me 20 years ago”

Romney mentions his wife in his concession speech: “… The woman I chose to marry”

It’s amazing how someone’s views on equality can come out in one simple sentence

still relevant

(via sherlockssunglasses)

thatfunnyblog:

basically how all female celebrities are treated by the media

(Source: versaceslut, via goldenfleeces)

jesuisperdu:

dino ignani

[early 1980s]

Details - Stephane Rolland Fall/Winter 2014-15 Haute Couture

(via beckendorph)

justlittlethings:

College dorm room idea:

1) Buy a copy of Just Little Things (they’re super cheap on Amazon).

2) Tear out the pages (you’ll feel awful but just do it) and trim the edges (optional).

3) Pin the pages up on your wall using thumbtacks, tape them up, hang them up with clothespins and yarn, or whatever you wish!

You’ll have a colorful wall full of all things happy! The pictures above are a few pages from the actual book, so just imagine a wall with 200+ more. :)

Some fans have made something similar (here), but with the book, you won’t have to spend the time/money printing or writing everything out.

Let me know if you like this idea! If you end up doing this, send me photos if you can! I’d love to see them. :)